Gerhard Self series by Bernhard Schlink

English | ePUB | 4.32 MB | Books: 3

The Author

Bernhard Schlink is a published German author. His book The Reader was adapted into a feature film that was released in 2008. He wrote The Other Man, which was adapted into a movie starring Liam Neeson, and Girl with Lizard. He was born July 6, 1944.

He was a jurist in Germany, something that has helped further inform his writing. He first became a judge in 1988. He has since served as a professor at Humboldt University teaching law since 2006.

Schlink first became a published author with Flights of Love, a collection of stories. It came out in 2001. He has also delved into non-fiction as well, publishing his book Der Vorleser in 1995. The title translates to ‘The Reader’, and is a semi-autobiographical novel.

It was a best seller in his Germany and subsequently America. It did quite well and its popularity led to the novel being translated into many languages. It was also a landmark moment as it was the first ever German book to make it to the N.Y.Times’ number one spot on its best selling books list.

He is also quite well known for his detective novels that feature a man character by the name of Selb. The word in German stands for self, so it is a knowing play on words. The series outside of Germany is known by the name of the Gerhard Self series. This fictional series kicked off in 2004 with the debut of the first novel, titled Self’s Punishment. The sequel came out in 2007 and in 2008 Self’s Murder came out, making the series a trilogy.

The Books


General, Fiction, Murder, Mystery & Detective, Investigation, Mystery Fiction, Private investigators, Germany

Starred Review This stellar series debut presents former Nazi prosecutor turned private investigator Gerhard Self in an unsettlingly matter-of-fact style.

Instead of the brooding and tortured soul readers might expect–or even demand–Gerd (as his many friends call him) comes across as wry and likable as he hustles up cases, flirts with attractive women of all ages, and worries about slipping into old age with only his cat for company. It’s the early 1980s, and Self has been hired by a boyhood friend to smoke out a hacker who’s playing havoc with the computers at Rhineland Chemical Works. But after Self springs a trap that gets the troublemaker murdered, he gradually faces the guilt he still carries for his youthful embrace of National Socialism. His simple refusal to let himself off the hook and step back into his old public prosecutor’s role after the war doesn’t seem like penance enough anymore. “I had planned to live at peace with my past,” he muses. “Guilt, atonement, enthusiasm and blindness, pride and anger, morality and resignation–I’d brought it all together in an elaborate balance. The past had achieved abstraction.” But Self’s unwitting participation in the new crime drives him to pursue the path of justice wherever it may lead.

A fascinating exploration of how people often manage to carve out normal lives even after being complicit in terrible acts. Frank Sennett

The books in suggested reading order:

Self’s Punishment
Self’s Deception
Self’s Murder